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Articles by Dartes Swimmers Past and Present

Every now and again, someone pops up out of the deep end and writes an article for the website. Sometimes these are former Dartes swimmers with happy memories to share. Often they're current members with something special or interesting to shout about. Either way, if it's interesting and in some way connected to Dartes or Doncaster Swimming, we'll probably publish it.
Here's one of those articles.

Importance of Strong Core and Abs for Swimmers

Introduction

Working out in the Tenerife rain Successful swimmers do lots and lots of core strength work. There are many ways to do that, but the end result is usually a very toned 6-pack stomach, and vastly improved balance and posture. You may think lying horizontal with the water supporting you is easy, but try it without moving forwards and it's as hard as keeping a bike upright without forward momentum.

Improved core strength helps improve body posture while swimming, which in turn increases distance per stroke and reduces those all important stroke counts. Streamlining out of turns also becomes much better: with greater distance travelled from a simple push and glide and the ability to dolphin kick faster for longer the number of strokes per length will once again reduce.

Considering all those points, the importance of holding rock solid body posture during the final stages of a race should become very clear. Each stroke taken amounts to extra work, so the more we can reduce the total number the better.

It doesn't hurt either of course, that on hot, sunny training camps you get to lounge around the pool and proudly show off those hard earned abs! Bonus all round really.

Here's a collection of stuff that might be of interest to anyone undergoing the sort of work that leaves you with 'Ab-Ache'.

Author: Dave Cuthbert
Date: 15 September 2012

Arizona Style

First up let's take a look at how they do things out in the desert at the University of Arizona. Hard work always feels more fun in the sun. How many of the exercises being done do you recognise from your own land training sessions? How much time and effort do you think has gone in to being able to perform them with as much poise and control as these athletes show? This is the standard you need to aim to emulate!

Watch more videos like this on FloSwimming

The Grand Master

The swim team at Cal Berkeley is probably the place to be when it comes to pushing the envelope in the weights room. Their star man, sprinter Nathan Adrian, won Olympic Gold in the 100m Freestyle in London, due in no small part to his work in the weights room.

Core Strength

Starting with our young athletes in Phase 4, we look at developing core strength. Core stability is an essential component for success in many sports but especially swimming. Whether it's the obvious advantage of being able to use the abdominal muscles during Dolphin kick, or simply being able to effortlessly hold a streamlined glide core strength cannot be overvalued.

Many of the exercises we employ during core training are demonstrated in the following video. Most are ideal for practicing in front of the TV at home.

And for those who like a little variety and invention in their stability land training, here we join the South Carolina Gamecocks using partially filled pipes (The Carolina Slosh Pipes) to train those small, stabilising muscles.
Video courtesy of FloSwimming.